Dr. Jeremiah Momper

Clinical Pharmacology

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Jeremiah D. Momper, Pharm.D., Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Clinical Pharmacy
Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences

Email
jmomper@health.ucsd.edu
Phone
(858) 822-0913
Research Summary

Dr. Momper’s research focuses on the application of quantitative pharmacology approaches to optimize the development and clinical use of drugs. Current research directions include evaluation of potential therapies for HIV infection in infants and pregnant women and the use of model-based methods to support scientific decision making in drug development. Dr. Momper directs the Drug Metabolism and Pharmacokinetics research laboratory concentrated on novel quantitative bioanalytical methods, in vitro ADME assays, and pre-clinical and clinical pharmacokinetic studies

 

Academic Achievements

Education:

Pharm.D. (2006) University of Pittsburgh; Ph.D. in Pharmaceutical Sciences (2011) University of Pittsburgh; Commissioner’s Fellowship (2011-2013) Office of Clinical Pharmacology, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration 

Teaching
  • Course Director, Clinical Pharmacokinetics (SPPS 226)
  • Course Chair, Regulatory Submissions and Strategy (DDPM 203)
  • Biopharmaceutics (SPPS 224)
  • Dosage Forms and Delivery Systems (SPPS 225)
  • Renal System I (SOMC 225)
  • Principles of Pharmaceutical Sciences and Drug Development (SPPS 263B)
  • Circadian Rhythms and Health (NEU 233)
Key Contributions
  • Described the pharmacokinetics of multiple antiretroviral drugs in pregnant women and their infants.
  • Developed a quantitative model of organic anion transporter (OAT)-mediated tubular secretion capacity across the pediatric age continuum.
Potential Collaborative Programs
  • Model based pediatric drug development and simulation
  • Clinical pharmacology protocol design and data analysis
  • Pre-clinical and clinical pharmacokinetic studies
  • Bioanalytical chemistry for the quantitative determination of drugs and metabolites in biological matrices